Ryan Snoddon has been predicting the weather for CBC News audiences in Newfoundland and Labrador for a decade, but Monday evening he begins a new adventure as the meteorologist for CBC in the Maritimes.

“It’s definitely a challenge,” Snoddon said of forecasting the weather for New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.

“But I feel like 10 years in Newfoundland and Labrador is a pretty good training ground.”

Snoddon grew up in Ontario on a beef cattle farm near Lake Simcoe, about an hour west of Peterborough.

“It was great-grandpa’s farm, and then grandpa’s farm and now my dad’s farm, and so we were raised there and weather was obviously a huge factor on the farm.”

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Snoddon explained to Information Morning Moncton that since his dad was a full-time lineman and a full-time farmer, he would take his summer holidays just to cut hay.

“One of my first jobs as a kid was to … scan all the different radio stations and write down a forecast on a note pad and report back to my dad,” he said.

“And so he would make the decision, ‘OK, should I cut hay today or should I wait a couple of days?’ And that was my first weatherman job.”

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Snoddon believes that’s where his love for the weather came from.

“And I love broadcasting as well — that’s actually what I went to school for. First was broadcast journalism, and then I was able to push my way into the weather, and I’ve since gone back to school for meteorology.”

Snoddon said he and his wife Annie wanted to move to the Maritimes so their two sons could be closer to extended family in Halifax and Ontario. Here he takes a final photo with his boys in front of the St. John’s green wall. (Ryan Snoddon Blog)

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Of course, Snoddon wants to get the weather forecast right but on those occasions when he doesn’t, he said, he hopes his new Maritime audience will be as understanding as people in Newfoundland and Labrador were.

“The weather [in Newfoundland and Labrador] was so challenging to predict but people were so forgiving. If you did get it wrong they would say, ‘Well, it’s Newfoundland and Labrador.’

“New Brunswick is a different beast than Nova Scotia is a different beast than Prince Edward Island. And they’re all kind of playing off one another, and so trying to nail that down on a daily basis is going to be a challenge.”

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